Never wonder who’s knocking at your door again. With the Ring Doorbell, you’ll receive alerts when your doorbell is pressed or motion is detected, allowing you to hear and interact with visitors. In addition to acting as a two-way communication device for your front door, it works as a security system; you can set motion detection zones from five to 30 feet outside your door. The sensor is quite sensitive, so it’s probably best to set its range and awareness levels as low as you’re comfortable with. If you’re willing to venture off Amazon (and pay a little more), the Nest Hello doorbell is another favorite option that works with Alexa.
I have tested Reolink Argus and Argus 2. Both are indoor/outdoor, hubless, battery-powered cameras. The cameras do not offer cloud storage. Instead, you can purchase and add an SD card. The cameras record in FHD 1080p, offer night vision, live streaming, mobile app access, and a 130° field of view. However, they lack other features offered by Canary, Arlo, and Nest including geofencing and the ability to connect to third-party devices.
All plans, including the freemium plan, offer access to the same security features and provide a semi-decent way of sorting through historical footage. Through the app’s “Library” section, you will have access to a timeline feature. You can view all recorded events by day. You will also be able to favorite an event, download, or share it. You can also filter recorded footage by favorites, motion events, audio events, manual recordings, or recordings triggered by IFTTT.

Although this looks intriguing, my experience with Ring products is that they work about 75% of the time on our two cameras. And the problems are definitely with Ring, not our network - as sometimes our iPhone / iPad won't connect, but an Android device right next to it on the same network will connect just fine to the video. Occasionally it is the other way around, but sometimes nothing will connect to the Ring camera even though my home network is up and working fine. That's annoying for video alerts... but for a home alarm, I don't think I would trust them based on my experience with our Ring cameras.
The abode Gateway also supports limited local functionality. This is in part thanks to the Gateway’s ability to communicate using its own proprietary protocol called abodeRF. If your internet is down, your automated rules will continue to run, assuming that the devices involved are connected to the Gateway directly and not through a third-party service like IFTTT.

P.S. My house was broken once when we was abroad, without breaking a door or a window. In fact, the thieves entered thru the front door without breaking anything – the lock was just magically opened. Because we know we didn’t lose any key, the assumption is that they used lock picking technique or a lock picking gun (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snap_gun) – So I don’t think it’s good to assume thieves are dumb (But i’m not in the USA so maybe you have different kind of thieves ;-] )..
Ring offers access to a timeline-style feature where you can view events going back six months (if you are subscribed). From the timeline, you can sort through ring events, motion events, starred events, or live view events. From the web app, you can also sort by device so that you can separate your Spotlight Cam footage from footage captured by your other devices. Right now, the feature isn’t very advanced. Soon, Ring plans to completely revamp their mobile app.
Ring's updated app (which will roll out to everyone in the coming weeks) brings lots of improvements for those invested in the ecosystem. You have quick and easy access from the main screen to the alarm features, as well as a glimpse of what your cameras are seeing. Things can be a little slow to load, depending how much equipment you have, but most of the time it works great.
The square wireless base station is the main component of the Ring Alarm system. It's 6.7 x 6.7 x 1.4 inches in size, and though it lay flat on a bookshelf for this review, it can be mounted on a wall. The base station has ZigBee and Z-Wave antennas, and while the latter is available to use with compatible third-party accessories, anything that isn't Ring-certified won't work with security monitoring.
Stick Up Cams will also integrate with Ring Alarm and Alexa in the coming months. When Ring Alarm is disarmed, Stick Up Cams inside the home will stop recording and detecting motion. When Ring Alarm is triggered and the siren sounds, it can be programmed to also prompt the Stick Up Cams to start recording. Neighbors with Alexa devices will be able to access their Stick Up Cam feed (i.e. “Alexa, show the living room camera”) and view the most recent motion event (i.e. “Alexa, show me the latest event from my backyard”). Additional Alexa functions and Ring integrations will be added to Stick Up Cams later this year.
Nest Cam IQ Outdoor will offer most of the same features as the indoor IQ (less the Google Assistant integration). The only difference between IQ and the original Nest Cam is the power cord. Unlike the original Nest Cam Outdoor, you will have to drill a hole to install the IP66-rated Nest Cam IQ Outdoor, unless you happen to have an existing opening. Nest Cam IQ Outdoor will start at $349. And this, my friends, is why I won’t be purchasing Nest Cam IQ. Not only is person detection sufficient and offered via the less expensive Nest Cam Outdoor, but I don’t have an existing opening, and I’m not going to drill. Plus, Nest Hello offers facial recognition and a pretty sweet Google Home integration.

1. Nest can record continiously which eliminates the problem of sleepy security cameras. As far as Ring cameras, Ring Pro offers a pre-buffer. As far as their other cameras, I’ve only tried Ring Spotlight wireless. It’s a battery-powered camera and does not pre-buffer. I believe I heard that the wired version does pre-buffer, but I haven’t personally tried it.
A couple of important things to note during setup. First, for the contact sensor, be sure to have the magnets aligned, otherwise it won’t work. We learned this the hard way after spending an hour troubleshooting. Second — and this is really important – depending on where you live, you may need to get a permit for the system from a local government agency. Ring helps you navigate through this process by looking up your address and telling you whether a permit is required.

Though the Ring Alarm system covers the bases for a home security setup, there’s a lot of room for integration with other smart home products that Ring has left on the table. For example, it’s not possible to use the Ring’s motion or contact sensors to trigger lights or adjust a smart thermostat when you leave or come back home. This is despite the fact that the Ring Alarm sensors are based on Z-Wave technology, which is a widely used smart home standard.

Oco Pro Cloud Video Surveillance Camera is easy Oco Pro Cloud Video Surveillance Camera is easy to use HD Wi-Fi camera with Cloud and SD card Recording for monitoring everything you care about: business home children pets elderly parents etc. No Monthly Fees required to access all camera features. Self-learning motion detection system helps Oco understand motion and ...  More + Product Details Close
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